Battle of Litte Bighorn



June 25 - June 26 1876

The Battle of the Little Bighorn (also known as Custer's Last Stand and the Battle of the Greasy Grass), was an armed engagement between combined forces of Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho people against the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army. The battle occured on June 25 - June 26 1876 near the Little Bighorn River in eastern Montana Territory.

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    Custer's last charge. Lithograph; 19th century. The Battle of the Little Bighorn was an armed engagement between a Lakota-Northern Cheyenne combined force and the 7th Cavalry of the United States Army. It occurred June 25–June 26, 1876, near the Little Bighorn River in the eastern Montana Territory. The battle was the most famous incident in the Indian Wars and was a remarkable victory for the Lakota and Northern Cheyenne. A U.S. cavalry detachment commanded by Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer was killed to the last man.

    18-01-01/41

    A check - "keep your distance". Travellers keep Native North Americans at bay. Coloured print.

    18-01-01/12

    Snowshoe Dance at first snowfall. Ojibwa, 1835-37. From "North American Indian Portfolio" by George Catlin Hand-colored lithographs; London; 1844-48. George Catlin was the first artist to observe the tribes of the Plains Indians and to illustrate their habits and customs from first-hand observation. His belief in the "noble savage", unspoiled by contact with the outside world, sustained him as he crossed and re-crossed the country - from the Mississippi to the Rockies - gathering raw material for his Indian Gallery.

    18-01-01/34

    Buffalo hunt chase. From "North American Indian Portfolio" by George Catlin Hand-colored lithographs; London; 1844-48. George Catlin was the first artist to observe the tribes of the Plains Indians and to illustrate their habits and customs from first-hand observation. His belief in the "noble savage", unspoiled by contact with the outside world, sustained him as he crossed and re-crossed the country - from the Mississippi to the Rockies - gathering raw material for his Indian Gallery.

    18-01-01/35

    Mah-to-toh-pa, The Mandan Chief. From "North American Indian Portfolio" by George Catlin Hand-colored lithographs; London; 1844-48. George Catlin was the first artist to observe the tribes of the Plains Indians and to illustrate their habits and customs from first-hand observation. His belief in the "noble savage", unspoiled by contact with the outside world, sustained him as he crossed and re-crossed the country - from the Mississippi to the Rockies - gathering raw material for his Indian Gallery.

    18-01-01/36

    Joc-o-sot (The Walking Bear), a Sauk Chief from the Upper Missouri. From "North American Indian Portfolio" by George Catlin. Hand-colored lithographs; London; 1844-48. George Catlin was the first artist to observe the tribes of the Plains Indians and to illustrate their habits and customs from first-hand observation. His belief in the "noble savage", unspoiled by contact with the outside world, sustained him as he crossed and re-crossed the country - from the Mississippi to the Rockies - gathering raw material for his Indian Gallery.

    18-01-01/37

    Wi-Jun-Jon (The Light) (Assiniboin) going to and returning from Washington. From "North American Indian Portfolio" by George Catlin. Hand-colored lithographs; London; 1844-48. George Catlin was the first artist to observe the tribes of the Plains Indians and to illustrate their habits and customs from first-hand observation. His belief in the "noble savage", unspoiled by contact with the outside world, sustained him as he crossed and re-crossed the country - from the Mississippi to the Rockies - gathering raw material for his Indian Gallery.

    18-01-01/38

    Indian Blackfoot shaman with tambourine and spear. From Illustrations of the North American Indians by George Catlin. Lithograph; 1876. George Catlin was the first artist to observe the tribes of the Plains Indians and to illustrate their habits and customs from first-hand observation. His belief in the "noble savage", unspoiled by contact with the outside world, sustained him as he crossed and re-crossed the country - from the Mississippi to the Rockies - gathering raw material for his Indian Gallery.

    18-01-01/39

    Indian Blackfoot chief with pipe. From Illustrations of the North American Indians by George Catlin. Lithograph; 1876. George Catlin was the first artist to observe the tribes of the Plains Indians and to illustrate their habits and customs from first-hand observation. His belief in the "noble savage", unspoiled by contact with the outside world, sustained him as he crossed and re-crossed the country - from the Mississippi to the Rockies - gathering raw material for his Indian Gallery.

    18-01-01/40

    The widow of the Indian chief guards the weapons of her dead husband, 1785. Canvas, 101,6 x 127 cm

    40-12-18/22

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